The Power of Pillow Talk - Spear's Magazine

The Power of Pillow Talk

The Power of Pillow Talk

Spear’s Editor-in-Chief William Cash bangs the Brexit drum with a last-minute plea from long-time friend Liz Hurley who ‘hates EU regulations on Hoovers and light bulbs’.

Forget the polls, pundits or even the power of the pen – whichever side wins, one thing the Referendum vote will be remembered for is the power of Pillow Talk.

After posting an eye catching Instagram photograph of herself in puris naturalibus in nothing more than a pair of high heels and a Union Jack pillow, Elizabeth Hurley helped the Leave cause with a record number of ‘Likes’ on her Twitter account.

The ripple effect was measured across the world.

Countries that had barely noticed the Referendum suddenly took notice after Hurley’s glamorous image (reminding readers of her role in Austin Powers) was posted. The Washington Times posted the image prominently saying that ‘Elizabeth Hurley took to Twitter to ask fellow Britons to vote to leave the European Union in the June 23 Brexit referendum. The English actress appears to have also left her clothes behind for the patriotic pitch.’

‘Vote tomorrow-whatever your persuasion. I’m for #Brexit & promise to neither gloat nor whinge. But VOTE!’ urged the 50-year-old actress and model who currently plays the Queen in the hit TV drama The Royals. ‘Ms. Hurley attached a photo of herself with a suggestive pose in which she clutched a Union Jack pillow to her chest and appeared to wear nothing but high heels,’ add the Washington-based newspaper.

The paper also listed Michael Caine, Joan Collins and Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes among fellow Brexiteers. ‘I believe we should be out. It’s about philosophy, it’s about democracy, it’s about democracy versus autocracy, all of those issues,’ Fellowes said.

The use of social media by celebrities to endorse their political point of view raises some interesting questions. Normally Britain’s showbiz community stay quiet on sensitive political issues as the majority of ‘luvvies’ – including the likes of Emma Thompson and actor Tom Hollander – support the Labour left.

However since the Referendum debate is ‘cross-party’, there has been a refreshing amount of free speech within the UK’s celebrity ranks. Indeed a social media battle ensued in the last days of the campaign between the likes of David and Victoria Beckham (with over 10 million Twitter followers), JK Rowling, and Elizabeth Hurley (just over 515, 000 followers) to capture popular hearts and minds on the eve of the historic vote.

The only problem with celebrity political endorsements is that when they speak or actually write (sans PR help), the words can often not help their cause – or even backfire. Beckham’s reason for backing ‘Remain’ was that he liked playing with European footballers.

At least Miss Hurley has proved that the power of her pen is as good as her pillow talk. In May, she wrote a sharp and witty column about why she was coming out for Brexit in Spear’s magazine (she hates EU regulations on Hoovers and light bulbs).

Earlier this week she posted a photo of the Spectator cover declaring itself for ‘Out’ with the beautiful image of a Union Jack butterfly opening its wings with the phrase ‘Out’ and ‘Into the World’. A former contributor to The Spectator herself, Hurley’s writing skills have been noted with her now being pursed for columns and comment by national editors. If Leave wins by a narrow margin, Miss Hurley should be made a Dame.



 

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