I predicted a riot - Spear's Magazine

I predicted a riot

Perhaps that is what is most surprising about this revolution: it’s not from the bottom up, but from the middle out.

My husband William Cash and I joined the Green Horse outside the Liverpool Street station (really more of an anaconda) of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse gathered at four tube stations around The City and marched to converge in front of the Bank of England with the other three Horsemen.

Upon arriving at the Bank of England, thick cordons of police kept the marches separate, but soon violence broke out and a man was bleeding on the floor ten feet away from us.

We then tried to make our way out of Threadneedle Street, past the Bank of England and down Princes Street, but were stopped by a thick cordon of riot police that hemmed in the crowd at all exits. For three hours we were unable to leave and had no access to food, drink or bathrooms, so we rejoined the crowds until we finally found an exit and made our way to the Cannon Street tube station and onto the District Line to safety and, ultimately, home.

The demonstrators came from all walks of life: many were clearly highly experienced protesters (who came prepared with a picnic to enjoy just in front of the Royal Exchange), some were retired professionals, but nearly all were middle class Guardian-readers – people who have lost ISAs, pensions and mortgages.

Perhaps that is what is most surprising about this revolution: it’s not from the bottom up, but from the middle out. Wouldn’t Karl Marx be surprised – and proud?

To read more from Spear's on the G20 Summit, see Josh Spero's liveblog from the ExCeL Centre and William Cash's analysis of how it will really affect tax havens.



 

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